Diario del proyecto Project Dragonfly / Projet Libellule

05 de agosto de 2022

Observation of the Week: Halloween pennant

This week's feature is a Halloween pennant, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user kathy_bill in Ontario. The Halloween pennant has been described as looking very similar to a butterfly. On hot days, it will often shade its thorax using its wings.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly by kathy_bill

Ingresado el 05 de agosto de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de agosto de 2022

Qui mange qui?

Les libellules sont un élément essentiel de la chaîne alimentaire dans les écosystèmes des milieux humides. Les larves des libellules sont des prédateurs en embuscade qui dévorent tout : autres larves d’insectes, têtards et petits poissons. Les larves sont aussi des proies, qui nourrissent les gros prédateurs aquatiques comme les poissons.

Les libellules adultes attrapent généralement leurs proies en plein vol : elles les captent avec leurs pattes. Les différentes mouches constituent l’essentiel de leur régime alimentaire. Les libellules vont même jusqu’à s’entredévorer. Elles sont aussi capables de se nourrir d’espèces plus grosses qu’elles. On a même observé une libellule dévorer un colibri.

Les nombreux liens entre prédateurs et proies sont bien connus, comme ceux que nous avons évoqués ci dessus. D’autres pourraient vous étonner. Répondez à notre jeu questionnaire Qui mange qui sur la faune des milieux humides pour mettre à l’épreuve vos connaissances (et peut être apprendre des faits nouveaux)!

dragonfly being eaten by sparrows
anonymous_ebirder.

Ingresado el 02 de agosto de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Who eats who?

Dragonflies are an important part of the food web in wetland ecosystems. As larva, they are ambush predators, eating many things, including other insect larvae, tadpoles and small fish. They are also prey, feeding larger aquatic wildlife like fish.

Dragonfly adults typically catch their prey while flying by grasping them with their legs. Various flies make up much of their diet, and they’ll eat each other, too. They are also capable of eating species larger than themselves. There is even evidence of a dragonfly eating a hummingbird.

Many predator-prey connections are well-known, like some of those listed above. Others may surprise you. Try our Who Eats Who wetland wildlife quiz to test your knowledge (and maybe learn something new)!

dragonfly being eaten by sparrows
A dragonfly being eaten by swallows, captured by anonymous_ebirder.

Ingresado el 02 de agosto de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

29 de julio de 2022

Observation of the Week: slaty skimmer

This week's feature is an slaty skimmer, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user kennedy_9 in Quebec. Slaty skimmer males are territorial and guard their mates, often from above. Females use their abdomens to flick their eggs into the water and toward shore.

Show your support by liking and commenting on our Observations of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

slaty skimmer by kennedy_9

slaty skimmer by kennedy_9

Ingresado el 29 de julio de 2022 por ckosheluk ckosheluk | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

22 de julio de 2022

Observation of the Week: eastern forktail

This week's feature is an eastern forktail, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user mmunc near Ottawa, Ontario. Forktails like this species are among the smallest damselflies, and females are orange at the start of their winged-adult stage but eventually change to slate blue as they mature.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

damselfly by mmunc

Ingresado el 22 de julio de 2022 por ckosheluk ckosheluk | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

19 de julio de 2022

Observation of the Week: mustached clubtail

This week's feature is an mustached clubtail, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user mikewerner near Elk Lake, Ontario. Mustached clubtails can often be found perched on rocks in or around streams and rivers, typically where the current is swift, or perched on the leaves of overhanging trees and bushes. They also frequently fly over riffles or rapids.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly macro by mikewerner

Ingresado el 19 de julio de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de julio de 2022

Observation of the Week: ebony jewelwing

This week's feature is an ebony jewelwing, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user awaysick in southern Ontario. Their brilliant metallic green bodies flash sunlight as they flit around streamside vegetation and their large black wings quickly attract attention. They are also short-lived, usually only living as a flying adult for about two weeks.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly macro by awaysick

Ingresado el 08 de julio de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

05 de julio de 2022

Les libellules et les monarques : des migrations multigénérationnelles

Les libellules sont légion durant l’été au Canada : elles arpentent le ciel pour attraper les insectes qui sont leurs proies et virevoltent dans les alentours des milieux humides, pour pondre leurs œufs dans la végétation et les environs. Mais lorsque l’été cède la place à l’automne, les espèces comme l’anax de juin ou anax précoce commencent leur migration dans le Sud.

Veuillez cliquer sur ce lien pour apprendre que tout le cycle annuel de l’anax de juin ou anax précoce est constitué de trois générations : deux générations migratrices et une génération non migratrice.

dragonfly macro by awaysick

Photo de awaysick

Ingresado el 05 de julio de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Dragonflies and monarchs: multi-generation migrations

iNaturalist observers know—dragonflies are a common sight during Canadian summers, zooming around the skies to catch their insect prey and darting around wetlands, laying their eggs in and around the vegetation. But as summer weather turns to fall, some species like the common green darner begin their journeys south.

Click here to see how the full annual cycle of the common green darner is comprised of three generations: two that are migratory and one that is non-migratory.

dragonfly macro by awaysick

Green darner photographed by awaysick

Ingresado el 05 de julio de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

04 de julio de 2022

Observation of the Week: southern pygmy clubtail

This week's feature is a southern pygmy clubtail, photographed and logged by iNaturalist user dannyoshea near Fredericton, NB. It is a secretive inhabitant of forests adjacent to pristine, spring-fed brooks, seepages and small rivers. Southern pygmy clubtail larvae are intolerant of excessive sedimentation and therefore are excellent indicators of high quality waters.

Show your support by liking and commenting on this Observation of the Week on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and follow us to learn more about Project Dragonfly and other iNaturalist projects.

Join the Project Dragonfly iNaturalist project now to celebrate dragonflies with us all summer long!

dragonfly macro by dannyoshea

Ingresado el 04 de julio de 2022 por e_ouimet e_ouimet | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Archivos